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Posts for category: Foot Conditions

By Dr. Kyle Sundblad
May 19, 2022
Category: Foot Conditions

Are you dealing with a nasty case of plantar fasciitis?

Heel pain is a frustrating little problem, especially if you are someone who values their morning run or daily exercise routine. Even if you aren’t what you’d call an avid exerciser, you may still find that your heel pain makes moving around and going about your day more complicated than you would like. A podiatrist is the best medical specialist to turn to when heel pain becomes an issue.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is a condition that causes inflammation within the thick band of tissue known as the plantar fascia. The plantar fascia runs the length of the foot along the soles from the toes to the heels and provides the arches of your feet with support and shock absorption. Unfortunately, microtears within the tissue can occur gradually over time (common in runners), leading to irritation and inflammation.

What Are the Symptoms of Plantar Fasciitis?

Those with plantar fasciitis may notice that their heel pain is at its worst first thing in the morning or after long periods of sitting or standing. The tricky thing is that the pain often subsides throughout the day, making you think you can get in your run or regular workout routine after all. The only problem with that is that the heel pain often comes back with a vengeance after exercising. Along with heel pain, you may also notice painful or aching arches.

When Should I See a Podiatrist About My Heel Pain?

We know that no one wants to make an unnecessary trip to see their podiatrist unless the situation warrants it. Of course, if you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes or nerve damage in your feet and you are experiencing heel pain or any symptoms, it is important that you always seek immediate medical care to prevent the issue from getting worse.

While most healthy individuals will be able to handle their heel pain on their own, it’s also important to know when you need proper and more comprehensive care from a podiatrist. It’s important to turn to a podiatrist right away if you have severe pain, pain that makes it impossible to walk or put weight on the foot, numbness or tingling in the heel or foot, or heel pain caused by an injury.

If at-home care isn’t easing your heel pain after five days, then you should also give us a call so that we can create a more effective treatment plan for you.

Don’t let heel pain drag you down. If you are having trouble managing your symptoms and they are impacting your everyday activities and quality of life, it’s time to schedule an evaluation with a podiatrist.

By Dr. Kyle Sundblad
April 12, 2022
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Bunion  

Get the facts about bunions and how to care for them.

Bunions are very common foot deformities that most often impact the joint at the base of the big toe. A bunion can enlarge and even reposition the joint, causing changes in the way you walk along with increased pain. Whether bunions run in your family, or our Sterling Heights, MI, podiatrists Dr. Kyle Sundblad and Dr. Sadegh Arab has told you that you have a bunion, here’s what you should understand about this common problem.

What causes a bunion to form?

Unfortunately, you can often blame genetics for your bunion. After all, this problem does run in families. So if your mom or your grandmother has a bunion, chances are good that you’ll deal with this issue at some point, too. The best thing you can do is properly care for your feet and visit our Sterling Heights, MI, podiatrists once a year to make sure that if you do develop a bunion that it’s detected early.

Sometimes previous foot injuries or certain foot conditions such as arthritis can impact the structure of the foot and increase your risk for bunions. If you’ve been diagnosed with arthritis or other health problems that impact the health and function of your feet, it’s important to speak with our team to discover ways to reduce your risk of developing bunions.

How is a bunion treated?

How our Sterling Heights, MI, podiatrists recommend treating a bunion will depend on the severity of the deformity. It’s important to recognize the early warning signs of a bunion so you can turn to us right away for care. In the beginning stages, our goal is to create a treatment plan that will slow the progress of the deformity. Some ways to treat your bunion include,

  • Icing
  • Rest
  • Elevation
  • Anti-inflammatory medications
  • Properly fitted and supportive footwear
  • Splinting or bracing
  • Custom orthotics

When is surgery necessary?

The benefit of turning to our Sterling Heights, MI, podiatrists for your bunions is that we can often prevent the need for surgery later in life by making sure you properly care for your feet now. Through a customized treatment plan, we can prevent the bunion from growing so large that it impacts the overall health and function of your feet; however, you may wish to consider bunion surgery if,

  • You are dealing with significant and chronic foot pain
  • You have trouble performing day-to-day tasks and activities
  • You have to avoid exercise due to foot pain
  • Wearing shoes leads to significant discomfort and pain
  • Your big toe has crossed over the smaller toes

Surgery is often the best course of action when home care isn’t alleviating your symptoms and the overall structure and function of your feet are impacted by your bunion.

Don’t let bunions impact your daily routine? Our Sterling Heights, MI, podiatrists work with patients regularly to find ways to ease bunion pain and swelling and prevent the need for surgery. To schedule an evaluation, call Advanced Foot, Ankle, & Wound Care at (586) 731-7873.

By Dr. Kyle Sundblad
April 01, 2022
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Bunions  
BunionsHave you been diagnosed with a bunion? A bunion is a common foot deformity that if left untreated can cause significant pain, swelling, structural changes and even trouble walking. Of course, it’s important to prevent a bunion from getting to this point, and the best way to do that is to turn to a podiatrist for a tailored-to-you treatment plan. The good news is that there are also some simple lifestyle changes you can make right now to slow the progress of your bunion.

Conservative Treatment Options

If a bunion is caught during the early stages, then you’re in luck. Most people can get away with at-home care and more conservative ways to manage their bunions. Most podiatrists will recommend conservative measures first to see if they ease bunion stiffness, pain and swelling. It’s when symptoms aren’t managed through these lifestyle changes that a podiatrist steps in to provide relief. Some conservative ways to treat bunions include,
  • Icing the bunion for 15-20 minutes at a time to ease pain and swelling. This can be done 3-4 times a day, every day, as needed.
  • Taking an anti-inflammatory such as ibuprofen that can reduce inflammation and pain (while medication only provides temporary relief, when you are in pain, this medication can certainly help)
  • Stretching out the foot with special mobility exercises for the feet and ankles (ask your podiatrist or simply search online for some of the best foot stretches to ease bunion stiffness)
  • Wearing proper footwear that provides the ideal cushioning, fit, and support
  • Avoiding high heels, shoes that put pressure on the bunion, and shoes with a pointed toe
  • Getting custom orthotics from a podiatrist (these custom-made shoe inserts can provide additional support for the deformed joint)
What happens if these options don’t work?

So, you’ve been trying to manage your bunion symptoms on your own but nothing seems to be working. Does this sound like you? If so, it’s time to employ the help of your trusty podiatrist. After all, that’s what they are there for. A podiatrist can provide you with the treatment plan you need when home care fails to provide you with the results you’re looking for. Your podiatrist may recommend splinting, padding or tapping, or may prescribe a stronger pain reliever. They can also suggest specialty footwear that can provide ample support. They can also determine if it’s time to get corrective bunion surgery.

If you adopt these simple solutions you may find that it drastically slows the growth of your bunions and may even keep you from needing surgery in the future. Of course, if your bunion is causing you severe pain, it’s always best to speak with a foot and ankle specialist to find out what you can do to better manage your symptoms.
By Dr. Kyle Sundblad
March 14, 2022
Category: Foot Conditions
What Is Raynauds DiseaseDo your fingers and toes sometimes turn numb, change color, or feel cold? While this is a common response to winter weather, if you have Raynaud’s disease, something more could be going on to impact the health and function of your blood vessels. If you find your fingers or toes turning white and going numb, you should talk with your podiatrists about Raynaud’s disease.

What is Raynaud’s disease?

This rare disorder temporarily narrows or restricts blood flow to the blood vessels of the extremities. Raynaud’s disease is characterized by an attack and is often the result of cold weather exposure. There are two types of Raynaud’s disease: primary and secondary. Primary Raynaud’s disease occurs on its own without a cause while secondary Raynaud’s disease is the result of an underlying health problem.

What causes it?

Sometimes Raynaud’s disease has no known cause (as is the case with primary Raynaud’s disease); however, certain autoimmune diseases, extreme stress, or cold weather exposure are typically the main causes. Risk factors that can increase the likelihood of primary Raynaud’s disease include:
  • Being a woman
  • Being under 30 years old (symptoms offer appear during the teen years)
  • A family history of Raynaud’s disease
Risk factors for secondary Raynaud’s disease include,
  • Thyroid disorders, autoimmune diseases, and other chronic diseases
  • Certain medications
  • Exposure to certain chemicals, cold weather, or vibrating machines

What are the signs and symptoms?

When an attack occurs, skin on the toes and hands often turns white or pale. You may notice a loss of feeling in the extremities, as well. The area may also turn blue. Then once circulation returns, the area will warm and the skin will turn red. You may also notice burning, tingling, or throbbing as the sensation returns. Raynaud’s attack can last anywhere from several minutes to several hours.

How is Raynaud’s disease treated?

If a certain medication or underlying health problem is causing these attacks, your doctor may recommend switching medications or can help you better manage these chronic health problems to reduce your risks for an attack. If your primary Raynaud’s attacks are the result of cold exposure, avoiding cold temperatures is the best way to prevent attacks. Ensure that you are also properly bundled and wearing warm socks and gloves if you have to go outdoors on cold days.

Numbness and color changes in the feet can also be signs of diabetes and nerve damage, so it’s important that you see your podiatrist right away to rule out more serious health concerns.
By Dr. Kyle Sundblad
February 11, 2022
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Blisters  
Preventing Blisters on Your FeetA blister can be a real nuisance. It can make it uncomfortable to walk around, let alone try to go on your run. Fortunately, there are some simple things you can do to reduce your risk of developing blisters. Take care of your feet and they will take care of you. Of course, if you have diabetes or nerve damage in your feet and you do find yourself dealing with a blister, it’s important to always turn to a podiatrist right away for care.
 

Wear the Proper Shoes

Whether you’re hiking, running, or simply walking to work, it’s important that you are wearing the appropriate shoes for the job. Shoes that don’t provide your feet with enough cushion and support, especially when pounding the pavement, can leave you dealing with blisters, calluses, and other foot injuries. Make sure that you are also getting shoes that provide the ideal fit. Shoes that are too tight or loose can rub against the skin and result in blisters.

Apply Padding

There are blister pads on the market for a reason! Even if you are wearing properly fitted footwear, you may still find that you need a little added protection for your feet. A blister pad can be used to protect a blister that you have or it can be used in places that are prone to blisters.

Wear the Right Socks

The socks that you wear are just as important for maintaining healthy feet as the shoes that you wear. Choose socks that wick away moisture and consider doubling up on socks if you are getting ready to participate in an activity that increases your chances of developing a blister. The added layer can provide more protection for your feet. If your socks become wet or moist, it’s important that you change your socks right away.

Use a Lubricant Before Exercise

Shoes and socks that rub against the feet can lead to blisters, so it’s important to reduce this type of friction by keeping feet lubricated. This is particularly important for runners or hikers. Apply petroleum jelly to the feet so that they are more likely to slide rather than rub against shoes and socks.

A podiatrist can recommend the appropriate footwear for you, provide custom orthotics and ensure that you provide your feet with the support and cushioning they need for all of your activities to prevent blisters from happening to you. If blisters are a common problem, talk with your podiatrist about how you can prevent this from happening.


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