Blog
By Dr. Kyle Sundblad
October 07, 2021
Category: Foot Injuries
Tags: Broken Toe  
Broken ToeA broken toe is one of the most common minor injuries that you can suffer. However, sometimes, it can prove difficult to tell whether or not you actually have a broken toe. As a result, it is best to know some signs that you do in fact have a broken toe. This is helpful information no matter whether you are planning to visit a podiatrist or if you are thinking about handling your broken toe all on your own. Stubbing your toe is pretty common and most of the time, the pain goes away relatively quickly and you continue with your day. If the pain does persist, you may have a broken toe, so keep these signs of a broken toe in mind. 

Are You Able to Put Weight on Your Foot?

One method that you can use to determine whether or not you have actually broken a toe is checking if you can put weight on your foot. If you can walk on your foot without limping or pain, your toe is likely not broken. Icing the toe and using some non-prescription anti-inflammatory medication will probably be enough. In the event that you continue to experience swelling or severe pain, you should see a doctor about your toe. 

Does Your Toe Have a Deep Wound?

You should take a close look at your injured toe. If your toe has a deep wound or cut, the bone in your toe might get exposed to the air and a doctor should check out your injured toe. Another sign that you have a broken toe is bruising. Additionally, one more sign that you have actually broken your toe is some discoloration on or near your toe. An obvious sign of a broken toe is if it is at a different angle than the toe on your other foot.

What Else Should I Know About Broken Toes?

Taping is a common solution for a broken toe. This works just fine if the break in the toe is simple and the bones are still in alignment. Taping your broken toe will not help it heal properly, though. That is why you should keep the following information in mind: 
  • Consult a doctor about your broken toe so it heals correctly.
  • Taping your toe could worsen the situation if you have a bad break in your toe. 
  • Taping your toe is only a viable solution in some circumstances.
By Dr. Kyle Sundblad
September 27, 2021
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Heel Pain   Achilles Tendon  

How your podiatrists in Sterling Heights, MI, can help with Achilles tendon and heel pain

The Achilles tendon does some important things, including moving your foot. When your Achilles tendon is tight, it can cause pain in your foot, especially your heel.

Dr. Kyle Sundblad and Dr. Sadegh Arab at Advanced Foot, Ankle & Wound Care, in Sterling Heights, MI, offer total foot care, including treatment of Achilles tendon problems and heel pain.

Tightness in your Achilles tendon can happen from:

  • Not sufficiently stretching the tendon before participating in a sport
  • Experiencing a sports injury
  • Being involved in an accident
  • Overuse without adequate rest

Some of the most common Achilles tendon-related conditions include:

  • Achilles tendonitis, which is inflammation of the tendon
  • Achilles tendinosis, which occurs over time
  • Tennis leg, which is caused by repeatedly pushing off of one leg
  • Achilles tendon rupture, which happens from sudden movement of the Achilles tendon

You can do a lot to prevent tightness and injury to your Achilles tendon. Remember to:

  • Stretch thoroughly before any activity involving your feet or legs
  • Substitute low-impact activities, which limit tendon stress
  • Walk or run on even, dry surfaces to avoid tendon injuries
  • Wear comfortable, appropriate footwear with plenty of support

Increase the intensity of your activities gradually, as you improve your physical conditioning. This helps keep you from overusing or injuring the Achilles tendon.

For moderate to severe Achilles tendon and heel pain, it’s best to visit a specialist, your podiatrist. Common Achilles tendon treatments include:

  • Palliative treatments including ultrasound, physical therapy, and thermal therapy
  • Wearing supportive devices including a cast or walking boot for added support while the tendon heals
  • Cortisone injections into the Achilles tendon to reduce inflammation and swelling
  • Anti-inflammatory medications to reduce swelling and inflammation

Achilles tendon tightness can cause substantial heel pain, making it difficult to walk and perform your daily activities. Your podiatrist can help you feel better.

To learn more about the treatment of Achilles tendon and heel pain, talk with the experts. Call Dr. Kyle Sundblad and Dr. Sadegh Arab at Advanced Foot, Ankle & Wound Care, in Sterling Heights, MI, at (586) 731-7873. Call today!

By Dr. Kyle Sundblad
September 24, 2021
Category: Foot Care
High Blood Pressure and Your FeetWhether you are concerned about high blood pressure or you already have been diagnosed with this chronic condition you may be surprised to hear that it can also impact your feet. After all, your blood pressure affects your circulatory system, which in turn impacts the body as a whole. Since uncontrolled or improperly controlled hypertension can damage blood vessels of the feet, you must have a podiatrist you can turn to to make sure your condition is under control.

What problems does high blood pressure pose?

People with hypertension often deal with plaque buildup in the blood vessels. This is known as atherosclerosis. Plaque buildup also causes a decrease in circulation in the legs and feet. This can also increase your risk for peripheral artery disease (PAD). Over time, this decreased circulation can also lead to ulcers and, in more severe cases, amputation. This is why it’s incredibly important that you have a podiatrist that you turn to regularly for checkups and care if you have been diagnosed with hypertension.

What are the signs of poor circulation in the feet?
 

Wondering if you may already be dealing with poor circulation? Here are some of the telltale signs:

  • Your feet and legs cramp up, especially during physical activity
  • Color changes to the feet
  • Numbness or tingling
  • Temperature changes in your feet
  • Hair loss on the legs or feet
  • Sores
If you are dealing with any of these symptoms you must schedule an appointment with your podiatrist. Simple physical exams and non-invasive tests can be conducted to determine how much loss of circulation is occurring in the feet. Your podiatrist will work with your primary doctor to make sure that your current medication is properly controlling your blood pressure.

By getting your blood pressure under control we can also reduce your risk for developing PAD, heart disease, and other complications associated with hypertension. Some medications can be prescribed by your podiatrist to improve peripheral artery disease. Surgery may also be necessary to remove the blockage or widen the blood vessel to improve blood flow to the legs and feet.

If you are worried about your hypertension and how it may be impacting the health of your feet, there is never a better time to turn to a podiatrist for answers, support, and care.
By Dr. Kyle Sundblad
August 30, 2021
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Cavus Foot  
High Arches in ChildrenWhen babies are born they are born with flat feet. Typically the arches of the feet don’t develop until children are 3-4 years old; however, sometimes the arches of the feet develop higher than they should, which can cause the feet to flex. This is known as cavus foot and this problem typically occurs within the first 10 years of a child’s life. Since this condition can impact mobility you must see a podiatrist if this is something you think your child might be dealing with.

The Problem with Cavus Foot

Cavus foot needs to be addressed right away by a podiatrist, as this condition can lead to a variety of issues for your child. Cavus foot is more likely to lead to imbalances within the feet, which in turn can also impact the function of the ankle, legs, hips, and even lower back. Children and teens with cavus foot may be more likely to deal with aches, pains, and strains within the feet, ankles, legs, and hips. This condition can also lead to metatarsalgia, Achilles tendonitis, and chronic ankle sprains.

Causes of Cavus Foot

In many cases, a muscle or nerve disorder that impacts how the muscles function causes cavus foot. This leads to imbalances that cause the distinctive high arches of this condition. Of course, other conditions such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, muscular dystrophy, and spina bifida can also increase the chances of developing cavus foot.

Treating Cavus Foot

You must be watching your little ones as they start to walk to see if you notice any differences in how they move. Catching these issues early offers your child the best chance at improved mobility and less risk for developing foot problems later on. Your podiatrist may work together with a neurologist to pinpoint whether a nerve disorder could be the underlying cause.

Once your foot specialist determines the root cause of your child’s cavus foot then they can map out a customized treatment plan. Milder cases may benefit from more conservative treatment options such as custom orthotics and arch supports; however, surgery is often necessary to correct this problem.

Any issues with mobility, particularly in children, should be addressed and assessed as quickly as possible. Turn to a podiatrist that also specializes in providing pediatric podiatry to children and teens, as they will be able to provide the most thorough treatment plan for your little one.
By Dr. Kyle Sundblad
August 18, 2021
Category: Foot Care
Mortons NeuromaAre you experiencing a sharp, burning pain between your toes that gets worse when walking or standing? Do you notice tingling or numbness in the toes, or pain and swelling on the soles of the feet? If so, you could be dealing with a condition known as Morton’s neuroma that causes thickening of the nerves between the toes. If you suspect that you might have Morton’s neuroma, a podiatrist will be the ideal doctor to turn to for treatment.

Are neuromas dangerous?

It’s important not to confuse a neuroma with Morton’s neuroma. A neuroma is a benign growth that develops on the nerves; however, Morton’s neuroma is not a growth; it’s simply inflammation and swelling of the tissue around the nerves that lie between the toes (often between the third and fourth toes).

What causes Morton’s neuroma?

Any kind of intense pressure or compression placed on these toes can lead to inflammation of the tissue around the nerves. Some people are more at risk for developing Morton’s neuroma. Risk factors include:
  • Playing certain sports such as running or tennis, which puts pressure on the balls of the feet
  • Wearing high heels with a heel that’s more than 2 inches tall
  • Wearing narrow shoes or shoes with pointed toes
  • Certain foot conditions such as bunions or hammertoes
  • Flat feet or high arches (or other congenital foot problems)
What are the signs of Morton’s neuroma?

Since this condition involves inflamed tissue, you won’t notice a growth or bump in the area; however, you may simply experience pain that is gradual and minor at first and is alleviated by not wearing shoes. Symptoms often get worse with time and result in:
  • Swelling between the toes
  • A sharp burning pain between the toes that gets worse with activity
  • Tingling or numbness in the foot
  • Feeling like there is a pebble or stone in your shoe (often at the balls of the feet)
  • Pain that’s intensified by standing on your tiptoes or wearing high heels or pointed-toe shoes
How is this foot problem treated?

Most people can alleviate their symptoms through simple lifestyle modifications including:
  • Icing
  • Rest
  • Massaging your feet
  • Shoe pads
  • Custom shoe inserts (that a podiatrist can craft just for you)
  • Supportive footwear that offers shock-absorption
  • Non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs
  • Steroid injections
  • Local anesthetic injections
Any persistent or severe foot pain or swelling, along with numbness or tingling, should be addressed right away by a podiatrist. There are many conditions, some serious, that can cause a lot of these same symptoms and a podiatrist will be able to provide an immediate and accurate diagnosis for your symptoms.




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