My Blog
By Dr. Kyle Sundblad
January 22, 2020
Category: Podiatry
Tags: Warts   Plantar Warts  

Oddly enough, there are a lot of Old Wives Tales and folk remedies surrounding warts. Perhaps you’ve even heard of some one them; however, if you end up dealing with one or clusters of these hard, skin-colored bumps you may be wondering how you got them and how to treat them. If you develop warts, particularly on the soles of your feet, this is something that your podiatrist can help you treat.

What are plantar warts?

All warts are the result of a virus that invades the skin through cuts or tiny open wounds. Warts, especially on the feet, can be mistaken for a corn or callus; however, unlike corns or calluses that often go away in a couple of weeks, it can take years for a wart to go away. During this time, warts can also spread to other areas of the body including the hands and face.

How do I know that I have plantar warts?

If you’ve never had a wart before you may not be able to distinguish this growth from other common foot problems. This is where a podiatrist can help. A foot doctor can diagnose warts through a simple physical exam. Plantar warts can cause pain, particularly when standing or walking. Patients who have diabetes or circulation problems in their feet should seek immediate medical care if they develop warts or experience any changes in their feet.

How are plantar warts treated?

While warts can go away on their own this can usually take years for the body to fight off the viral infection. Since plantar warts can be uncomfortable or even painful many people turn to a podiatrist to treat warts. The type of treatment that your foot doctor will recommend will depend on the size, amount and location of the wart or warts. Common wart treatments include:

  • Medication: a special acid-based medication (e.g. salicylic acid) is applied to the skin where the acid will break down the wart. Several applications may be required over the course of several weeks in order to get rid of the wart.
  • Freezing: sometimes warts can be frozen off through a procedure known as cryotherapy
  • Curettage: this is the surgical removal of a wart using a special scalpel (local anesthesia is applied to the area to numb it before treatment)
  • Laser: laser treatment can also be used to breakdown and destroy the wart

It’s important to protect your feet from potential reinfection. If you are prone to developing plantar warts then talk with your podiatrist about measures you can take to keep your feet healthy and free from infection.

By Dr. Kyle Sundblad
January 08, 2020
Category: Podiatry
Tags: Sprained Ankle   Sprain  

One wrong step and you could just end up dealing with a sprained ankle. A sprain occurs when the ankle suddenly rolls inwards or outwards, which jolts the ankle joint out of place and also overstretches (and perhaps even tears) the ligaments and tendons of the ankles. These tendons also provide the feet with support. It’s important to understand how to best care for a sprained ankle and when you should see a podiatrist for care.

You could be dealing with an ankle sprain if you experience:

  • Swelling
  • Ankle pain
  • Tenderness
  • Bruising
  • Limited range of motion
  • Stiffness
  • Trouble putting weight on the ankle

If you suspect that you have sprained your ankle it’s important to call your podiatrist right away. A foot doctor will be able to discuss your symptoms with you and then determine whether you should come in for an immediate evaluation. A doctor will also provide you with a comprehensive treatment plan that will promote a fast and complete recovery.

There are different degrees of a sprain and the way your podiatrist recommends treating the injury will depend on its severity and the symptoms you are experiencing. Mild sprains can often be managed with simple home treatment. This includes resting and staying off the ankle as much as possible as well as:

  • Bandaging or wrapping the ankle
  • Wearing an ankle braces
  • Using crutches (for more serious sprains)
  • Elevating your ankle to reduce swelling
  • Stretching and strengthening exercises
  • Taking pain relievers like ibuprofen to reduce pain and swelling
  • Not putting weight on the ankle
  • Icing the ankle 20-30 minutes, 3-4 times a day (for the first 48 hours after injury)

It can take up to 10 days for a mild sprain to heal, while more severe sprains can take several weeks. When you come into the office for an evaluation, your podiatrist will also discuss how long you should stay off the ankle and avoid certain activities.

It is rare for a sprained ankle to require surgery; however, if there is significant damage to the ligaments that could lead to long-term instability and other issues, or if your symptoms do not improve with home care, then your foot and ankle doctor may recommend surgery to repair the torn ligament.

With proper and prompt care an ankle sprain should heal completely and not require additional treatment; however, the minute you experience symptoms of a sprained ankle or ankle injury you should see your podiatrist as soon as possible.

By Dr. Kyle Sundblad
December 11, 2019
Category: None
Tags: Untagged

Dealing with heel pain? Isn’t it time you found out more about what’s causing your discomfort?

Heel Pain

Heel pain is nothing to scoff at. While it might not seem like a big deal when you first notice it, over time it can become a downright nuisance. Heel pain can make it more difficult to move around and it can even limit your day-to-day activities. If you have no idea what might be going on, your Sterling Heights, MI podiatrist might be able to answer your burning questions.

What is causing my heel pain?

There are many reasons why you could be experiencing heel pain, which is why it’s so important to visit your foot doctor at the first sign of an issue. Only then can we really determine the root cause. Of course, one of the most common causes of heel pain is plantar fasciitis.

What is plantar fasciitis?

The plantar fascia is a thick band of ligaments that connect your toes to your heel bone. When they become inflamed, this causes heel pain, stiffness and a host of other issues.

What are the symptoms of plantar fasciitis?

If this condition is truly the cause of your heel pain, then you’ll more than likely notice a stabbing pain at the bottom of your foot that may be worse in the morning when you take your first couple steps. You may also notice that the pain subsides a bit during physical activity but immediately comes back full force right after. You may also experience stiffness or limited mobility as a result of the plantar fasciitis.

How can I treat my heel pain?

Most heel pain can easily be treated with more conservative measures including:

  • Rest
  • Avoiding high-impact activities
  • Elevating the foot
  • Taking over-the-counter pain relievers
  • Splinting
  • Icing

Most causes of heel pain like plantar fasciitis or Achilles tendinitis will go away with these simple at-home measures. However, for those with more persistent or severe cases, you may need to talk to your foot doctor about other options including extracorporeal shockwave therapy or corticosteroid injections to reduce pain and swelling and to help speed up the healing process.

Contact Kyle W. Sundblad, D.P.M., Podiatrist

Heel pain doesn’t have to take over your life. Turn to your Sterling Heights, MI foot doctor for the help and care your feet need to stay healthy.

By Dr. Kyle Sundblad
December 11, 2019
Category: None
Tags: Untagged

Welcome to the Blog of Advanced Foot, Ankle, & Wound Care

Whether you are an existing patient or searching for a podiatrist in the Sterling Heights, MI area, we’re excited you are here. With the podiatric industry advancing, we recognize the importance of keeping our patients and visitors up to date with all of the new and exciting things taking place in our practice.

As we move forward with our blog, we hope to promote good foot health as a vital part of your healthy lifestyle. Here you will find a variety of articles and topics including podiatry news, advancements in podiatric treatments, practical foot and ankle health advice and updates from our practice. 

We hope you find our blog to be helpful, engaging and informational to ensure your best foot and ankle health

As always, feel free to contact Advanced Foot, Ankle, & Wound Care with any questions or concerns.

-- The Podiatry Team at Advanced Foot, Ankle, & Wound Care





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